Posted in Latin VII

Six days before the kalends of November

We used our class to-day to prepare our colloquy (dialogue).  It was decided that you will all present in class on Tuesday 8 November.  Your homework is to continue practising your lines.

An Ancient-Roman relief showing a schoolboy (discipulus) learning a poem from a scroll under the watchful eye of his schoolmaster (praeceptor).
An Ancient-Roman relief showing a schoolboy (discipulus) learning a poem from a scroll under the watchful eye of his schoolmaster (praeceptor).
Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

Six days before the kalends of November

To-day, we started out by practising our analysis of verbs by looking at some verbs that we had never seen before.  I had you interpret the ending and guess the meaning of the stem through related words in English.

We then had our probātio (quiz).  Most of you scored ninety per-cent or higher … very well done!  And well done also to those of you who managed to figure out the connexion between the images: the twin gods Castor and Pollux.

Finally, we introduced the final project for the term.  You are to imagine how Vancouver’s culture would change if, in an hypothetical future, another culture came to dominate British Columbia, and then to create an artefact from this changed culture.  Your homework is to brainstorm  (which culture? what kind of artefact?) and to bring your ideas in writing to Tuesday’s class.  You are not obliged to use any of the ideas that you come up with during your brainstorming: I just want to make sure that you’ve begun to think about it.

The three columns to the right with the fragment of wall on top are the remains of the temple of Castor and Pollux in the Roman Forum.
The three columns to the right with the fragment of wall on top are the remains of the temple of Castor and Pollux in the Roman Forum.
Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

Eight days before the kalends of November

To-day we split into groups and practised our verbs by composing Latin sentences for others to translate into English.  Remember to approach all Latin methodically: find the verb, interpret its ending, and then deal with the rest.

We have a probātio (quiz) on Thursday.  It is only concerned with verbs (no other vocabulary).  There are ten questions: six are on endings, and only four on the vocabulary, so learn your endings!  Remember that you can use Quizlet to practise your vocabulary.

If you have not already done so, please complete part B of assignment 503.  If you have completed that, you have no homework.

Posted in Latin VII

Eight days before the kalends of November

Today we added to our vocabulary (104), and we practised our sentences in groups.  Remember that you can review your vocabulary on Quizlet.

pensum: Continue to memorise your colloquy (301).


I taught some of you imperatives (commands), as follows.

Mechanic’s method

Endings:

  • no singular ending
  • plural ending: -te

Examples:

  1. Think! (sg.)
    = stem + vowel + ending
    = put + ā + (no ending)
    = putā.
  2. Answer! (pl.)
    = stem + vowel + ending
    = respond + ē + te
    = respondēte.

Scout’s method

First-conjugation (Ā) endings, for verbs like amāre:

  • singular: amā.
  • plural: amāte.

Second-conjugation (Ē) endings, for verbs like monēre:

  • singular: monē.
  • plural: monēte.

Examples:

  1. Think! (sg.)
    1. putō, putāre is in the first conjugation, like amāre.
    2. Find the stem: putāre → put/āre → put- is the stem.
    3. Find the ending: amā → am/ā → -ā is the ending.
    4. stem + ending
      = put- + -ā
      = putā.
  2. Answer! (pl.)
    1. respondeō, respondēre is in the second conjugation, like monēre.
    2. Find the stem: respondēre → respond/ēre → respond- is the stem.
    3. Find the ending: monēte → mon/ēte → -ēte is the ending.
    4. stem + ending
      = respond- + -ēte
      = respondēte.
Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

Fifteen days before the kalends of November

We had a workblock today, so you had some time to work on your parallel lives assignment.  This is due next Tuesday 25 October.  Because we have no class until then, feel free to e-mail me if you have any questions.

Your homework is to complete your parallel lives (406) and part B of exercise 503.  If you have not completed part A of that exercise, then you must do so, too.

Remember to submit all work in hard copy or online in your Latin folder.

Posted in Latin VII

Fifteen days before the kalends of November

Today we introduced your first colloquy (dialogue), no. 301 in the class folder in Google Drive.  Your homework is to learn the colloquy.

We introduced the colloquy by talking about the different stages in Latin’s history:

  • Old Latin
    • This was the earliest written form of the language, ending around 75 BC.
    • The playwright Plautus wrote in Old Latin.
  • Classical Latin
    • This was the Latin spoken and written by the Roman upper class from the Late Republican Period (c. 75 BC) to about AD 180.
    • The great Roman writers all wrote in Classical Latin: Cicero, Virgil, Cæsar, Horace, Ovid, Pliny the Elder, Pliny the Younger, Seneca, …
    • It is the point of reference for all other forms of Latin, which is why we are learning Classical Latin.
  • Vulgar Latin
    • This was Latin spoken by the common people at the same time that Classical Latin was cultivated among the aristocracy.  It became the common language throughout the Roman provinces of Italia, Gallia, Hispania and Dacia.
  • Late Latin
    • This was the successor of Classical Latin, written mostly by Christian authors of the Late Imperial Period, of whom St Augustine is one of the most important.
  • Mediaeval Latin
    • This was the language spoken and written by bishops, scholars and kings during the Middle Ages.  It springs from Classical and Late Latin and looks constantly back to them.  It has a wide range of specialised vocabulary because it is a language of learning.  St Thomas Aquinas is the greatest author of Mediaeval Latin.
  • Church Latin (Ecclesiastical Latin)
    • This is the Latin that grew out of Mediaeval Latin as it was used in the Roman Catholic Church.  Its pronunciation follows Italian (since the pope lives and works in Rome), and since the twentieth century its spelling and expression has grown closer to the Classical norms.
  • New Latin (Neo-Latin)
    • This is an attempt to revive Classical Latin as a living language, mostly by American university professors.  It tries to adapt the Classical language to the modern world.
  • Modern Romance languages
    • The Vulgar Latin of Italia became Italian.
    • The Vulgar Latin of Hispania became Spanish and Portuguese.
    • The Vulgar Latin of Gallia became French, Provençal and Wallonian.
    • The Vulgar Latin of Dacia became Rumanian.
Posted in Latin VII

Three days after the ides of October

We played another round of the Race through Rome today to continue to practise our verbs.  Very well done to you all!

Your only new homework is to practise your vocabulary on Quizlet.  If you have not already done so, please also finish drill 505 and assignment 402.  You may submit them either on paper or in your personal Latin folder on Google Drive (the folder that I shared with you that has your name on it).

Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

Three days before the ides of October

Today we played a board game to practise the verbs of the first and second conjugation.  Well done to all of you!

nullum pensum uōbīs est: you have no homework!  The outline of your parallel lives should already be done (if not, you’d better get on that …).  I will provide some feedback on your outline over the weekend, and you will have time in class next week to work on the assignment itself.  The final due date is Tuesday 25 October.

Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

Five days before the ides of October

Today, we practised our vocabulary using Quizlet live.  We also talked about using the infinitive with other verbs.  For example:

  • amō docēre.  I love to teach.
  • ambulāre dēbeō.  I have to walk.  I ought to walk.

Your homework is to complete section A in exercise  503 in the class folder on Google Drive and to complete your outline (plan) for the parallel-lives assignment (406).  Please submit both on paper or in your personal Latin folder on Google Drive.  Please also review your vocabulary (Quizlet).