Posted in Latin VII

The day before the nones of October

Today we learned a little about the Roman army.

Using the video, we were able to extract the following key information together:

  • provincial army
    • is spread out across the Empire
    • has a chain of command
    • legions are heavy infantry, citizens
    • auxiliaries are lighter troops, non-citizens
  • urban garrison
    • urban cohorts and vigiles (watchmen) were like the police and firemen
    • the Praetorian Guard guarded the emperor and often interfered in imperial politics
  • navy
    • The main navies were on the eastern and western coasts of Italy
    • The navies were never as important as the legions
These legionaries are using their large shields in a protective testudo (tortoise) formation during an attack under the emperor Trajan.  This sculpture is part of the pillar (creatively named Trajan’s Column) that the emperor erected to commemorate his victory.
These legionaries are using their large shields (scūta, singular scūtum) in a protective testūdo (tortoise) formation during an attack under the emperor Trajan. This sculpture is part of the pillar (creatively named Trajan’s Column) that the emperor erected to commemorate his victory.

pensum: assignment 402 in the class folder on Google Drive

Posted in Latin IX

The day before the nones of October

Today we discussed the links, similarities and differences between European-Canadian colonisation of British Columbia and the Roman conquest of Gaul.  To that end, we looked particularly at the exhibit Unceded Territories that we saw on Tuesday and at the example of the Cowichan sweater.  Some highlights were:

  • transition from traditional, manual crafts for subsistence to commercial work, in part because of the Great Depression
  • change of materials or works because of new technology
  • the incidental changing of culture through trade and imbalances in power or numbers
  • the purposeful changing of culture through residential schools (Canada) or colōniae (Rome)

pensum:

Continue work on your parallel lives (doc. 406).  In particular:

  • continue your research
  • select the three events for each subject
  • begin composing your outline