Posted in Latin VII

The day before the nones of October

Today we learned a little about the Roman army.

Using the video, we were able to extract the following key information together:

  • provincial army
    • is spread out across the Empire
    • has a chain of command
    • legions are heavy infantry, citizens
    • auxiliaries are lighter troops, non-citizens
  • urban garrison
    • urban cohorts and vigiles (watchmen) were like the police and firemen
    • the Praetorian Guard guarded the emperor and often interfered in imperial politics
  • navy
    • The main navies were on the eastern and western coasts of Italy
    • The navies were never as important as the legions
These legionaries are using their large shields in a protective testudo (tortoise) formation during an attack under the emperor Trajan.  This sculpture is part of the pillar (creatively named Trajan’s Column) that the emperor erected to commemorate his victory.
These legionaries are using their large shields (scūta, singular scūtum) in a protective testūdo (tortoise) formation during an attack under the emperor Trajan. This sculpture is part of the pillar (creatively named Trajan’s Column) that the emperor erected to commemorate his victory.

pensum: assignment 402 in the class folder on Google Drive

Author:

The Arval Brethren were one of eldest of the many priestly colleges of the religion of the Ancient Roman state, tending to the cult of dea Dia, a nature-goddess, and of the ancestors so as to ensure a good harvest. During the reign of the emperor Augustus, the college was used as a tool of imperial unity and control. The term ‘arval’ comes from ‘arvum’, which means ‘a ploughed field’, and reflects their agricultural origin.

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