Posted in Latin VII

Six days before the kalends of November

We used our class to-day to prepare our colloquy (dialogue).  It was decided that you will all present in class on Tuesday 8 November.  Your homework is to continue practising your lines.

An Ancient-Roman relief showing a schoolboy (discipulus) learning a poem from a scroll under the watchful eye of his schoolmaster (praeceptor).
An Ancient-Roman relief showing a schoolboy (discipulus) learning a poem from a scroll under the watchful eye of his schoolmaster (praeceptor).
Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

Six days before the kalends of November

To-day, we started out by practising our analysis of verbs by looking at some verbs that we had never seen before.  I had you interpret the ending and guess the meaning of the stem through related words in English.

We then had our probātio (quiz).  Most of you scored ninety per-cent or higher … very well done!  And well done also to those of you who managed to figure out the connexion between the images: the twin gods Castor and Pollux.

Finally, we introduced the final project for the term.  You are to imagine how Vancouver’s culture would change if, in an hypothetical future, another culture came to dominate British Columbia, and then to create an artefact from this changed culture.  Your homework is to brainstorm  (which culture? what kind of artefact?) and to bring your ideas in writing to Tuesday’s class.  You are not obliged to use any of the ideas that you come up with during your brainstorming: I just want to make sure that you’ve begun to think about it.

The three columns to the right with the fragment of wall on top are the remains of the temple of Castor and Pollux in the Roman Forum.
The three columns to the right with the fragment of wall on top are the remains of the temple of Castor and Pollux in the Roman Forum.