Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

Four days before the ides of November

Today we started out, in honour of Remembrance Day, listening to I vow to thee, my country.

We then looked a little more at nouns, which are proving a little tricky (since they almost double the complexity of the sentence!).  If you have not already done so, your homework is to complete exercise 504 nos. 1-9.

There are now two documents in the grammar folder on Google Drive to help you: 204 has the table of endings for nouns, and 205 gives a step-by-step explanation of how to read a Latin sentence.  205 also includes all the grammatical tables that we have seen so far, which I think will prove useful.

Posted in Grex Latinus

Six days before the ides of November

To-day we looked a little more at the technical points of the passage that we first looked at last week (about the map), particularly the endings.  (In the following list, the slash separates singular and plural forms.)

For the nouns

  • subject of the verb: -a/-ae
  • object of the verb: -am/-ās
  • place where (with the preposition in): -ā/-īs

For the verbs

  • commands: -ā/-āte
  • is/are = est/sunt

Note also that the endings of adjectives must reflect the noun they describe.  So …

  • praeceptor bonus.  The teacher is good. (masculine)
  • puella bona.  The girl is good. (feminine)
  • templum bonum.  The temple is good. (neuter)

If you could look over the vocabulary for next week, that would be grand, as we shall then be able to read the whole passage more or less smoothly.

Posted in Latin VII

Six days before the ides of November

We had a relaxed lesson to-day.  We started out playing Quizlet Live to review our vocabulary, and we spent the balance of our time building the landscape for our model.  We are going to try to begin the papier-mâché next week.

We also looked at the scorecard with which you will score your condiscipulī when we present our colloquy on Thursday (or, failing that, Tuesday).  Remember that there is a prize for the group with the highest score!

Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

Six days before the ides of November

I was a little late this morning because I was helping with the Grade 5s to-day, so you had a little time to research for your artefact assignment.  (Thank you for being so patient!)  I really like the ideas that you are coming up with … keep it up!

We spent the balance of class time looking a little at nouns.  Your homework is to put this into practice with drill 504 (questions 1-9).

Posted in Latin VII

Three days before the nones of November

We covered a lot of ground to-day!  We started out by talking about how to memorise the colloquy that I’ve assigned you.

  • divide it into parts, so that you don’t have to learn it all at once (cue-cards are a god way of doing this)
  • practise a little bit often, instead of trying to learn everything at once
  • say it aloud
  • find a rhythm, rhyme, or even a bit of music to help you remember what follows what
  • practise, practise, practise!

After that, we began building our model of the Roman army in action.

Your homework is to finish preparing your colloquy.  We shall present on Thursday, not Tuesday as originally planned.

Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

Three days before the nones of November

Today we took most of our time to practise reading verbs and sentences in preparation for the introduction of nouns by looking at ex. 503 part D.  Your homework is to complete ex. 503 part C (which should be slightly easier, as it is a translation from Latin to English).  Note also the new vocabulary, which includes our first three nouns!

We also introduced the endings of the nouns, though we haven’t done anything with them yet.  I shall be adding a document about nouns to the Grammar folder in Google Drive in the near future.

Posted in Grex Latinus

kalends of November

We had the first meeting of our Grex Latīnus (Latin Club) to-day!  We are trying out the book Latin via Ovid, and we decided that we liked it well enough to try it at least one more time.  You can find the chapter in the folder on Google Drive that I have shared with you.

This writing is from a mediæval copy of The Metamorphoses, a long poem composed by the Ancient Roman poet Ovid.
This writing is from a mediæval copy of The Metamorphoses, a long poem composed by the Ancient Roman poet Ovid.  Latin via Ovid is based on Ovid’s work.

 

Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

kalends of November

To-day we started by looking again at stems and endings using some verbs with prefixes that we had not seen before.

We then talked a bit about the new project, and I gave you some time to continue brainstorming.  Your homework is to choose a culture and an artefact for your project.  (You can still change, but you need to have an initial idea.)

This statue shows a wide range of influences. Buddhism comes from India, but the statue itself is from Afghanistan. It also shows influences from Greek culture (especially in the hair), because Afghanistan was once part of the empire of Alexander the Great.
This Buddhist statue shows a wide range of influences. Buddhism comes from India, but the statue itself was made in Afghanistan. It also shows influences from Greek culture (especially in the hair), because Afghanistan was once part of the empire of Alexander the Great.