Posted in Latin VII

The day before the kalends of March

To-day we emphasised the first two steps of the process of reading a Latin sentence: finding and making sense of the verbs.  In the second half, we took a look at what etchings are and began to plan mock-etchings to illustrate our fables.

pensum: Finish the rough draught of the illustration (‘etching’) for your fable.

Ernest Griset’s etching for “The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse” (1874).
Ernest Griset’s etching for “The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse” (1874).
Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

Seven days before the kalends of March

This morning, …

  1. we began by practising our endings on Conjuguemos (with the activity, Nominatives and accusatives);
  2. we continued by listening to the terms in context in the Gloria from Haydn’s Lord Nelson Mass (link below);
  3. we looked at the following three examples; and
    1. Marcus habet librum.
    2. puerī pilam habent, sed puellae nōn habent pilam.
    3. populus nōs amat.
  4. we concluded with a quiz.

Posted in Latin VII

Nine days before the kalends of March

To-day we continued reading the dialogue 302.  Using the following process:

  1. Find all the verbs and conjunctions that connect them.
  2. Analyse the verbs: what are their stems, vowels and endings?
    Render each verb in English.
  3. Find all the nominative noun, if there be one.  This is the subject of the verb.
    Adjust your English rendering accordingly.
  4. Find all the accusative nouns, if there be any.  They are (most likely) the direct object of the verb.
    Add them to your translation.
  5. Account for any remaining words (like -ne).
    Complete your translation.
  6. Check your work.