Posted in Latin IX, Latin VIII

The day before the nones of April

To-day we finished discussing the five fragments of Greek lyric poetry.  If you have not already, please put your answers to the questions in your personal Latin folder so that I can see them.

We shall next turn our attention to an Ode from Horace (doc. 413).  Your homework is to complete the questions in that document.  (They’re all pretty straight-forward.)

Some motifs that we have seen so far:

  • love (particularly scorned love)
  • emotion
  • youth and old age (≈ carpe diem)
  • people and relationships

Key terms for our study of poetry:

  • allusion (the verb is to allude)
  • lyric
  • motif
  • speaker

It is important that you be able to describe a poem with respect to these terms.  We may add one or two more words to this list before the end.

Author:

The Arval Brethren were one of eldest of the many priestly colleges of the religion of the Ancient Roman state, tending to the cult of dea Dia, a nature-goddess, and of the ancestors so as to ensure a good harvest. During the reign of the emperor Augustus, the college was used as a tool of imperial unity and control. The term ‘arval’ comes from ‘arvum’, which means ‘a ploughed field’, and reflects their agricultural origin.

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